Publication

Plastic Atlas Japan special edition Cover page 2

Plastic Atlas Japan Special Edition (6 pages in English)

Published: 27 May 2022
Article

Japan has the second highest plastic management index (PMI) in the world, thanks to its advanced waste management system and high levels of local cooperation. On the other hand, Japan’s per capita plastic consumption is also quite high. Innovative policies, strategies, and action plans are required for Japan to promote the circulation of resources and build a sustainable lifestyle and society.

Coal Atlas (Korean)

Coal Atlas 석탄 아틀라스

Published: 18 February 2022
Atlas

The coal boom has negative consequences for humans and nature that outweigh its economic benefits. Coal does not just kill the climate. In coal mines, terrible working conditions are rife. Accidents are commonplace. The environmental and health costs linked to the use of coal to generate electricity are enormous. The atlas provides insights on how turning away from fossil (and nuclear) fuels towards renewable energy can offer huge economic and social opportunities. 

Meat Atlas 2021

Published: 7 September 2021
Atlas

There is hardly any other food that pollutes our environment and the climate as badly as meat. However, no government in the world currently has a concept of how meat consumption and production can be significantly reduced. But if the sector continues to grow as it has up to now, almost 360 million tons of meat will be produced and consumed worldwide in 2030. With ecological effects that are hard to imagine.

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WNWR Korean Report 2019 cover

World Nuclear Waste Report 2019 세계 핵폐기물 보고서 2019

Published: 26 August 2021
Report

This publication is a translation of the South Korea case studies section in the first edition of the World Nuclear Waste Report published in 2019. It attempts to spark a debate in South Korea on the complexities of dealing with nuclear waste. For the last decade since the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, many civil organisations, experts and citizens have denounced the South Korean government's continued dependence on, and management, and development of nuclear power plants but to no avail.